Craig-DiLouie-Suffer-The-Children-cover

Book Review: Suffer the Children, by Craig DiLouie

Originally posted on Girl Meets Monster:
In his latest horror novel, Suffer the Children, Craig DiLouie’s apocalyptic vision is an interesting departure from the typical end-of-the world scenario. Although DiLouie has become known for his zombie apocalypse fiction, a sub-genre of horror that he excels at, in this chilling narrative he shines a light on some of our most common…

MKDposter

Featured Font

Miss Kitty Delux A little cartoony, a little retro, a little coquettish, Miss Kitty Delux is ready for fun. Used in a non-OpenType aware application, she’s a lively little typeface. Use her in an OpenType aware application and she really shines: Contextual Alternates automatically dress her up the way she was meant to be. Gussy her up even more with…

pinker

Just What Do You Mean By “Etchings?”

Over on FaceBook, a writer friend shared the link to “Get Rid of On-the-Nose Dialogue Once and For All,” an excellent piece by K.M. Weiland about improving dialogue through subtlety and subtext. The article reminded me of this RSA Animate video, an animation of a short talk by psychologist and linguist Steven Pinker on indirect communication. For writers, “Language as a…

White Rabbit

We’re All Mad Here

Wednesday, after two and a half years of work, I graduated from Seton Hill University’s MFA in Writing Popular Fiction Program. For some ungodly reason (at a Catholic university, no less) I was appointed class speaker. What follows is my commencement speech. It’s longer than my usual posts, but I hope you enjoy it. As for me, I’m going to…

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Easy As Pie

Pecan Pie is a wonderful thing. You mix up a bunch of stuff—in one bowl—pour it into a crust, bake, and people are impressed. Pretend you worked hard. Don’t tell them how easy it was. The hardest part is the crust, and you have options. If gluten isn’t a problem, and you enjoy making traditional crusts, knock yourself out. If…

Wood engraving by Sol Eytinge, form the 1839 Ticknor and FIelds edition.

Ode to Joy, Redux

Charles Dickens’s A Christmas Carol It’s the holiday season, full of stress and cookies and stress and family and stress. Part of me wants to hibernate until June and another part doesn’t want to miss all the fun. In honor of the holidays, I’m rerunning a post I wrote for school, a year and a half ago. Please do not expect me…

Wild Fell

Michael Rowe’s Wild Fell

Quiet Horror is a misnomer. Quiet Horror is quiet in the same way the whisper in the night—while you’re lying alone and awake—is quiet. Rather than relying on jump-scares, shock, or visceral imagery, Quiet Horror seeps under your skin and into your mind and doesn’t let go. Michael Rowe’s Wild Fell, a 2013 nominee for the Shirley Jackson Award for outstanding…

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Robot Love: It’s All an Illusion

My Robot Illusion Scarf knitting pattern has been getting a lot of love lately. Last week, a Reddit user received one as a gift and posted about it. All of a sudden, my Knitting page was getting lots of hits and the pattern lots of downloads. “Cool,” I thought, “the more robots the better.” Yesterday, the robot stats exploded again,…

I Am (Not Only) a Camera

Point of View can make or break a story. As writers, we have a lot of decisions to make. Who will tell the story—or be our POV character. Will the POV character tell the story in first (I), second (you), or third (she) person? Do we need more than one POV? Writer and editor Jon Gingrich explains a few of…

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